The Nutritionist Reviews: Ask the Nutritionist: Diet and Health Myths Part 2 -->

Ask the Nutritionist: Diet and Health Myths Part 2

aI found this article the other day that even taught me some new nutrition facts. This is an article from Yahoo Health written by David Zinczenko who is the author of Eat This Not That. This is part 2. Here is part 1.

Myth #8: Restaurants comply with nutrition disclosure regulations


Reality: Most restaurants would rather load you up with additional cheap calories

Even though many restaurants offer healthy alternatives, you could still be at the whim of the kitchen's cook. A recent E.W. Scripps lab investigation found that "responsible" menu items at chains ranging from Chili's to Taco Bell may have up to twice the calories and eight times the fat published in the restaurants' nutritional information.
Myth #9: Sports drinks are ideal after-workout refreshment

Reality: You need more than that to keep your muscles growing

Carb-loaded drinks like Vitaminwater and Gatorade are a great way to rehydrate and reenergize; they help replenish glycogen, your body's stored energy. But they don't always supply the amino acids needed for muscle repair. To maximize post-workout recovery, a protein-carb combination helps such as milk and cereal.

Myth #10: You need 38 grams of fiber a day

Reality: More fiber is better, but 38 is nearly impossible

That's the recommendation from the Institute of Medicine. And it's a lot, equaling nine apples or more than a half dozen bowls of instant oatmeal. (Most people eat about 15 grams of fiber daily.) The studies found a correlation between high fiber intake and lower incidence of heart disease. But none of the high-fiber-eating groups in those studies averaged as high as 38 grams, and, in fact, people saw maximum benefits with a daily gram intake averaging from the high 20s to the low 30s.

Put the Truth to Work for You: Just eat sensibilty. Favor whole, unprocessed foods. Make sure the carbs you eat are fiber-rich—that means produce, legumes, and whole grains—because they'll help slow the aborption of sugar into your bloodstream.

Myth #11: Saturated fat will clog your heart

Reality: Fat has gotten a bum rap

Most people consider turkey, chicken, and fish healthy, yet think they should avoid red meat—or only choose very lean cuts—since they've always been told that it's high in saturated fat. But a closer look at beef reveals the truth: Almost half of its fat is a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid—the same heart-healthy fat that's found in olive oil. Second, most of the saturated fat in beef actually decreases your heart-disease risk—either by lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol, or by reducing your ratio of total cholesterol to HDL (good) cholesterol.

Myth #12: Reduced-fat foods are healthier alternatives

Reality: Less fat often means more sugar
Peanut butter is a representative example for busting this myth. A tub of reduced-fat peanut butter indeed comes with a fraction less fat than the full-fat variety—they’re not lying about that. But what the food companies don’t tell you is that they’ve replaced that healthy fat with maltodextrin, a carbohydrate used as a filler in many processed foods. This means you’re trading the healthy fat from peanuts for empty carbs, double the sugar, and a savings of a meager 10 calories.

Put the Truth to Work for You: When you're shopping, don't just read the nutritional data. Look at the ingredients list as well. Here's a guideline that never fails: The fewer ingredients, the healthier the food.
Myth #13: Diet soda is better for you

Reality: It may lead to even greater weight gain

Just because diet soda is low in calories doesn’t mean it can’t lead to weight gain. It may have only 5 or fewer calories per serving, but emerging research suggests that consuming sugary-tasting beverages—even if they’re artificially sweetened—may lead to a high preference for sweetness overall. That means sweeter (and more caloric) cereal, bread, dessert—everything. In fact, new research found that people who drink diet soda on a daily basis have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

Myth #14: Skipping meals helps you lose weight

Reality: Skipping meals, especially breakfast, can make you fat

Not eating can mess with your body's ability to control your appetite. And it also destroys willpower, which is just as damaging. If you skip breakfast or a healthy snack, your brain doesn't have the energy to say no to the inevitable chowfest. The consequences can be heavy: In a 2005 study, breakfast eaters were 30 percent less likely to be overweight or obese.

Put the Truth to Work for You: The perfect breakfast? Eggs, bacon, and toast. It's a nice balance of all the nutritional building blocks—protein, fiber, carbs—that will jumpstart your day. The worst? Waffles or pancakes with syrup. All those carbs and sugars are likely to put you into a food coma by 10 a.m.

Myth #15: You should eat three times a day

Reality: Three meals and two or three snacks is ideal

Most diet plans portray snacking as a failure. But by snacking on the right foods at strategic times, you'll keep your energy levels stoked all day. Spreading six smaller meals across your day operates on the simple principle of satisfaction: Frequent meals tame the slavering beast of hunger.

Put the Truth to Work for You: Make sure each mini meal blends protein and fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, which will sustain the feeling of fullness.

*Please note, these tips were not written by me. I found the article on Yahoo and wanted to share it with my readers.

5 comments:

  1. Great post! This one - Myth #8: Restaurants comply with nutrition disclosure regulations. is VERY scary. Sigh.

    Thank you for the congrats :) I will definitely be posting lots of updates

    ReplyDelete
  2. I stumbled this.

    The Nourishing Homemaker

    http://nurturedfamilylife.blogspot.com/2011/01/alpine-weight-loss-secrets-book.html

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for sharing those myths on diet and health. I agree that skipping meals especially breakfast can only worsen your diet.

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  4. Wow high claims, I majored in nutrition as well - but I find your accusations hard to digest (pun intended), can you please cite your sources?

    ReplyDelete

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